Fatherhood Programs Help Your School Or Organization Grow

Fatherhood programs can not only help your school or institution connect better with men but also create some lasting benefits for all people involved. Here are four things to know about what fatherhood programs or presentations can do for your group.

You will empower men to be more active in their families.

Times have changed and men must no longer limit themselves to just the roles of just 9-5 workers who have no genuine contact with their kids. However, for many men, there is still a divide between wanting to spend more time with their kids and knowing how to be active with their children. When you build programs that help men be better dads, you teach men how to move from being just a parent to an involved daddy.

You will create a more stable home environment for the children in your schools.

A parent who knows how to parent and nurture their children will have more chances to build a stronger home for their kids. When you teach men how to embrace fatherhood, you teach men to be present and responsive to their kids. Like a foundation in a building, this investment in the unseen support structure of fathering pays off. Knowledge creates power. This empowering of dads create strong family foundations.

Dads will start to volunteer and participate more in your other offerings.

Here is the thing that many program coordinators aren’t aware of: many men are uncomfortable in school settings. Women dominate most educational settings and it can be intimidating for some men to enter into these political structures. By offering fatherhood programs that help men understand their roles with their children, you are signaling that you are a “man-friendly” institution and you are doing everything you can to acknowledge and accept their gifts of time and presence.

Programs taught by men for other men model good parenting behavior.

As your programs grow and you can begin to train and utilize men as presenters and instructors, you will be providing a role-model of strong fathers. Although female instructors are very capable to teach essential concepts, younger and new fathers will especially benefit from having male mentors in training positions. There’s an old adage that says “iron sharpens iron,” and this is especially true in helping men become good parents.

Although fatherhood programs in your school or program will initially seem to be for the good of the men themselves, you will find that your entire community will gain from the time and resources spent on teaching men to be good dads